01 The Hal Boyle Award 2014

Clockwise from top left: Adam Nossiter, Nori Onishi, Sheri Fink and Helene Cooper.

Clockwise from top left: Adam Nossiter, Nori Onishi, Sheri Fink and Helene Cooper.

When the world’s attention focused on the devastating spread of Ebola in West Africa, reporters for The New York Times delivered, day after day, foreign correspondence at its best. In a series of powerful stories, Times correspondents captured the crisis in all its dimensions – writing lyrically about the human drama and delivering smartly analytical pieces about the global effort to stop the disease’s spread and where that effort went wrong. They also dug beneath the surface of the unfolding disaster with stories that showed a deep understanding of the continent, writing sensitively about the toll the disease was taking on African cultural traditions such as hand-holding in church and kissing friends and relatives. In the tradition of Hal Boyle, for whom this award is named, Times reporters never shied away from the front lines despite the risk. In one memorable piece, the Times wrote about the death of a star basketball player in Liberia and several generations of a household destroyed. In another, a 4-year-old orphaned by Ebola roams a clinic looking for someone to take her home, another soul adrift.

Read some of the winning stories:

Fear of Ebola Breeds a Terror of Physicians >>

Ebola’s Cultural Casualty: Hugs in Hands-on Liberia >>

Those Who Serve Ebola Victims Soldier On >>

A Family Shattered:
Loving Care Turns
Into a Deadly Risk >>

Ebola Victim Went From Liberian War to a Fight for Life >>

Cuts at W.H.O.
Hurt Response
To Ebola Crisis >>

An Ebola Orphan’s Plea: ‘Do You Want Me?’ >>